ARB education consultation: an update
 

ARB education consultation: an update

archiZen

In February 2023, ARB launched ‘Tomorrow’s Architects’, a public consultation on proposals for a new regulatory approach to how architects are trained and educated. Our proposals aimed to modernise the competencies required of architects to face emerging and future challenges, including the climate emergency, and improve the flexibility and innovation for universities and other types of learning providers. We wanted to remove regulatory barriers and make our approach to quality assurance more proportionate, and create the flexibility for new routes to becoming an architect in the UK. This was an invite-only event for learning providers. 

 

View the results here: https://arb.org.uk/consultations/results/education-consultation-results/

 

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Nazart

Thanks archiZen, I had already read this and this is what I think….

 

As if the education of architecture students wasn't problematic already then they want to reduce the learning needed even more.  Instead of making the qualification keep high standards they are in a way dumbing down the requirements needed to be an architect and the responsibility that they need to take on to run a project.

 

The PEDR for a lot of partII’s working in large offices can be limiting to how much exposure they get to all the RIBA stages.  If you are lucky and working in a smaller practice, dealing with clients and contractors is part of the job.  You have more hands-on experience when there are problems and how they are dealt with.  So already there is a knowledge gap. If you decrease the time for practical experience you will probably have to reduce the standard of the part III…..then you will produce architects not fit to run job IMO.

 

Keeping the two year minimum requirement is essential before the part III……the examination is hard but if you can’t answer the questions in a classroom what are you going to do on site?

This is an article from BD not sure I agree with some of it but it has a few good points.

archiZen

An update from the ARB:

New Competency Outcomes for architects and Standards for learning providers

Earlier this month ARB announced the Board’s decision to continue reforming the initial education and training for architects. Following a major public consultation exercise on proposals that were developed through thorough research and engagement, the Board decided to change the regulatory framework for educating architects, including new Competency Outcomes for architects, a new accreditation approach including new Standards for learning providers.

 

You can see the full results of the consultation and all the Board’s decisions here:
https://arb.org.uk/consultations/results/education-consultation-results/

Today we have published two important documents as part of our reforms: https://arb.org.uk/publications/arb-accreditation-competency-outcomes-and-standards-for-learning-providers/

 

ARB education consultation: Q&A

On Wednesday 11 October, 12:00 – 13:00, we will host a Q&A webinar to present on ARB’s next steps for implementing the new framework, and to respond to your questions on the guidance published today. Learn more and register below.

Register for the webinar

 

If you would like any more information about what we’ve published today or our plans, please do contact us at communications@arb.org.uk.

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Jane

About time architectural education went through some serious changes.  

Personally, I think there needs to be more emphasis on construction in education and how to build what you design.  The rudimentary knowledge of design, construction and specification after Part 2 is beyond belief.

The practical experience is fundamental and the minimum 2 years is essential before the Part 3.

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Nazart

I have said this before, this is an extremely difficult subject, not for the faint of heart, and when you present your portfolio at the university you want to attend, you should be chosen on the merits and nothing else.

 

There are already many issues with the competency within the profession and reducing or altering the standards of education to ‘fit’ a wider demographic is not going to improve that. I’m glad that the RIBA is pushing back on this.

 

I’m not sure there is going to be any gain in this as when you start lowering standards for an occupation such as Architecture, you start to lower the expectation of what an architect is or does.

This post was edited 8 mo ago by Nazart
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archiZen

ARB education consultation (11/10/2023): Q&A

 

Webinar replay:

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This post was edited 7 mo ago by archiZen
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